Agile Practice Guide

Created in partnership with Agile Alliance®, the Agile Practice Guide* provides tools, situational guidelines and an understanding of various agile approaches available to enable better results. It is specially useful for those project managers accustomed to a more traditional environment to adapt to a more agile approach.

The Agile Practice Guide contains the following sections:

  • An Introduction to Agile describes the Agile Manifesto mindset, values and principles. It also covers the concepts of delinable and high-uncertainty work, and the correlation between the Lean, Kanban Method and agile approaches.
  • Life Cycle Selection introduces the various life cycles discussed in the practice guide and covers suitability filters, tailoring guidelines and common combinations of approaches.
  • Implement Angile: Creating an Agile Environment talks about critical factors to consider when creating an agile environment such as servant leadsership and team composition.
  • Implementing Agile: Delivering in an Agile Environment discusses how to organize a team and common practices the team can use for delivering value on a regular basis. It provides examples of empirical measurements for the team and for reporting status.
  • Organizational Considerations for Project Agility explores organizational factors that impact the use of agile practices, such as culture, readness, business practices and the role of a project management office (PMO).

*This Practice Guide was jointly funded by the Agile Alliance® and developed in collaboration with members of Agile Alliance®. Agile Alliance® does not endorse any agile methodology or certification.

Source: PMI.org [direct link]


This is a retyping text, from the original source, as a training skills to the personal language development of Guilherme Augusto, so I ask you to forgive any typing errors and if possible, let me know. This same content can be found in Portuguese clicking here.

Talent Triangle

While technical skills are core to project and program management, PMI research tells us they’re not enought in today’s increasily complex and competitive global marketplace.

Companies are seeking added skills leadership and business inteligence – competencies that can support longer-range strategic objectives that contribute to the bottom line.

The PMI Talent Triangle®

The ideal skill set – the Talent triangle – is a combination of technical, leadership, and strategic and business management expertise.

What this means to project program talent – what this means to you – is a focus on developing the additional skills you need to meet envolving demands on your profession. but in doing so, it also means new opportunities to elevate your value as a strategic partner in business success.

Source: PMI.org [direct link]


This is a retyping text, from the original source, as a training skills to the personal language development of Guilherme Augusto, so I ask you to forgive any typing errors and if possible, let me know. This same content can be found in Portuguese clicking here.